trap

Information
Speech
trap
Definition
Noun 
A machine or other device designed to catch (and sometimes kill) animals, either by holding them in a container, or by catching hold of part of the body.
I put down some traps in my apartment to try and deal with the mouse problem.
Etymology
Noun 
A trick or arrangement designed to catch someone in a more general sense; a snare.
Unfortunately she fell into the trap of confusing biology with destiny.
Etymology
Noun 
A covering over a hole or opening; a trapdoor.
Close the trap, would you, before someone falls and breaks their neck.
Etymology
Noun 
A wooden instrument shaped somewhat like a shoe, used in the game of trapball.
Etymology
Noun 
The game of trapball itself.
Etymology
Noun 
Any device used to hold and suddenly release an object.
They shot out of the school gates like greyhounds out of the trap.
Etymology
Noun 
A bend, sag, or other device in a waste-pipe arranged so that the liquid contents form a seal which prevents the escape of noxious gases, but permits the flow of liquids.
Etymology
Noun 
A place in a water pipe, pump, etc., where air accumulates for want of an outlet.
Etymology
Noun 
History
A light two-wheeled carriage with springs.
Etymology
Meaning note
historical
Noun 
Slang
A person's mouth.
Keep your trap shut.
Etymology
Meaning note
slang
Noun 
Belongings.
Etymology
Meaning note
in the plural
Noun 
Slang
A cubicle (in a public toilet).
I've just laid a cable in trap 2 so I'd give it 5 minutes if I were you.
Etymology
Meaning note
slang
Noun 
Sports
Trapshooting.
Etymology
Meaning note
sports
Noun 
An exception generated by the processor or by an external event.
Etymology
Meaning note
computing
Noun 
Slang
History
Australia(AU)
A mining license inspector during the Australian gold rush.
Etymology
Meaning note
Australia, slang, historical
Noun 
Slang
Informal
A vehicle, residential building, or sidewalk corner where drugs are manufactured, packaged, or sold. (Also used attributively to describe things which are used for the sale of drugs, e.g. "a trap phone", "a trap car".)
Etymology
Meaning note
US, slang, informal, African American Vernacular
Noun 
Slang
Informal
Pejorative
Offensive
A non-op trans woman or (femininely dressed) transvestite.
Etymology
Meaning note
slang, informal, chiefly derogatory, offensive
Noun 
A kind of movable stepladder.
Etymology
Noun 
Music
A fusion genre of hip-hop and electronic music.
Etymology
Meaning note
music
Verb Transitive
To physically capture, to catch in a trap or traps, or something like a trap.
Etymology
Meaning note
transitive
Verb Transitive
To ensnare; to take by stratagem; to entrap.
Etymology
Meaning note
transitive
Verb Transitive
To provide with a trap.
To trap a drain.
To trap a sewer pipe.
Etymology
Meaning note
transitive
Verb Intransitive
To set traps for game; to make a business of trapping game.
Trap for beaver.
Etymology
Meaning note
intransitive
Verb Intransitive
To leave suddenly, to flee.
Etymology
Meaning note
intransitive
Verb Intransitive
Slang
Informal
To sell narcotics, especially in a public area.
Etymology
Meaning note
US, slang, informal, African American Vernacular, intransitive
Verb Intransitive
To capture (e.g. an error) in order to handle or process it.
Etymology
Meaning note
computing, intransitive
Noun 
A dark coloured igneous rock, now used to designate any non-volcanic, non-granitic igneous rock; trap rock.
Verb 
To dress with ornaments; to adorn (especially said of horses).
Etymology
See Etymology section, list no.3.
Noun 
Slang
The trapezius muscle.
Etymology
See Etymology section, list no.4.
Meaning note
slang, bodybuilding
Noun Verb Adjective Adverb Other
Etymology
From Middle English trappe, from Old English træppe, treppe ‎(“trap, snare”) (also in betræppan ‎(“to trap”)) from Proto-Germanic *trap-. Akin to Old High German trappa, trapa ‎(“trap, snare”), Middle Dutch trappe ‎(“trap, snare”), Middle Low German treppe ‎(“step, stair”) (German Treppe "step, stair"), Old English treppan ‎(“to step, tread”) and possibly Albanian trap "raft, channel, path". Connection to "step" is "that upon which one steps". French trappe and Spanish trampa are ultimately borrowings from Germanic.
This item has been removed.
Akin to Old English trappe ‎(“trappings”), and perhaps from an Old French word of the same origin as English drab ‎(“a kind of cloth”).
Shortening.
Bibliography
  • Wiktionary :trap (CC BY-SA 3.0)
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