me

Information
Speech
me
Definition
Pronoun 
As the direct object of a verb.
Can you hear me?
Etymology
Pronoun 
Obsolete
Myself; as a reflexive direct object of a verb.
Etymology
Meaning note
obsolete
Pronoun 
As the object of a preposition.
Come with me.
Etymology
Pronoun 
As the indirect object of a verb.
He gave me this.
Etymology
Pronoun 
Colloquial
Myself; as a reflexive indirect object of a verb; the ethical dative.
Etymology
Meaning note
US, colloquial
Pronoun 
Colloquial
As the complement of the copula (“be” or “is”).
It wasn't me.
Etymology
Meaning note
colloquial
Pronoun 
Colloquial
(AU,NZ)
My; preceding a noun, marking ownership.
Etymology
Meaning note
Australia, Britain, New Zealand, colloquial
Pronoun 
(colloquial, with "and") As the subject of a verb.
Me and my friends played a game.
Etymology
Pronoun 
(nonstandard, not with "and") As the subject of a verb.
Usage note
Me is traditionally described as the accusative pronoun, meaning it should be used as the object of verbs and prepositions, while the nominative pronoun I should be used as the subject of verbs. However, “accusative” pronouns are widely used as the subject of verbs in colloquial speech if they are accompanied by and, for example, "me and her are friends". This usage is traditionally considered incorrect, and "she and I are friends" would be the preferred construction. Using me as the lone subject (without and) of a verb (e.g. "me want", "me like") is a feature of various types of both pidgin English and that of infant English-learners, and is sometimes used by speakers of standard English for jocular effect (e.g. "me likee", "me wantee"). Although in the spoken version of some dialects 'me' is commonly used as a possessive, in writing, speakers of these dialects usually use my. Some prescriptivists object to the use of me following the verb to be, as in “It wasn’t me”. The phrase “It was not I” is considered to be correct, though this may be seen as extreme and used for jocular effect.
Etymology
Determiner 
Dialect
Eye dialect spelling of my.
Etymology
See Etymology section, list no.2.
Meaning note
dialectal
Noun Verb Adjective Adverb Other
Etymology
From Middle English me, from Old English mē ‎(“me”, originally dative, but later also accusative), from Proto-Germanic *miz ‎(“me”), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-, *(e)me-n- ‎(“me”). Cognate with Scots me ‎(“me”), North Frisian me ‎(“me”), Saterland Frisian mie ‎(“me”), Dutch me, mij ‎(“me”), Low German mi ‎(“me”), German mir ‎(“me”, dative), Icelandic mér ‎(“me”, dative), Latin mē ‎(“me”), Ancient Greek μέ ‎(mé), ἐμέ ‎(emé, “me”), Sanskrit मा ‎(mā, “me”).
me
Bibliography
  • Wiktionary :me (CC BY-SA 3.0)
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